Types of Plastic




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Types of Plastic We Use

We are frequently asked whether or not it is safe to use plastic bottles and containers to hold essential oils. Undiluted essential oils should not be stored in plastic containers, as some properties in many essential oils will break down the plastic, which can destroy the oil and often cause leakage. However, since our plastic bottles and containers are made of the highest grade of plastic, essential oils can be stored in our plastic bottles and containers for several months if the oils are diluted with a carrier oil. The following is information about the types of plastics our bottles and containers are made from.


Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET or PETE) is a thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is commonly used in beverage, food, and other liquid containers. The term polyethylene terephthalate is a source of confusion because this substance, PET, does not contain polyethylene. In scholarly journals it is written as poly(ethylene terephthalate) for the sake of accuracy and clarity. Depending on how it is processed and heated, PET can appear transparent. It is clear, tough, and shatterproof. PET is excellent for any food-related products and is FDA, NSF, and USDA approved for direct contact.

Some common uses include soft drink, water, sports drink, mouthwash, ketchup, and salad dressing bottles and peanut butter, pickle, jelly, and jam jars.

PET does not contain BPA or any estrogen-like chemicals. It is not known to leach any chemicals that are suspected of causing cancer or disrupting hormones. However, as with many plastic products, if reused multiple times, the chemicals can start to break down over time.

PET is commonly recycled and has the number 1 as its recycling symbol.


High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) is a linear polymer that is prepared from ethylene by a catalytic process. HDPE is made without branching, which results in a more closely packed structure with a high density and high chemical resistance. HDPE has excellent resistance to diluted and concentrated acids, alcohols, and bases. It has good resistance to aldehydes, esters, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, and mineral and vegetable oils. It is excellent for any food-related products and is FDA, NSF, and USDA approved for direct contact. 

Some common uses include milk, water, and juice bottles, yogurt and margarine tubs, cereal box liners, and grocery, trash, and retail bags. It is also used in bottles for household item such as shampoo, conditioner, detergent, cleaners, etc.

HDPE is not known to leach any chemicals that are suspected of causing cancer or disrupting hormones. However, as with many plastic products, if reused multiple times, the chemicals can start to break down over time.

HDPE is commonly recycled and has the number 2 as its recycling symbol.